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Thread: louis...The Wire!

  1. #81
    From Outta Space! Cozmo D's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Be@Dec 21 2004, 10:20 AM
    That season finale was WEAK......muhh phuckin DIET WATER....as far as i'm concerned...it ended last week
    The finales are always like that. They seem to be more concerned with recap and letting you know what is going to go on during the off-season. It's always the week before with the big climax.
    Alright
    Tap the lightpole and we'll be jammin all night
    And ain't nobody callin' the cops
    'Cause everybody's here freakin', if they're older they're doin the rock
    And every block from all around
    Comes runnin' to the park when they hear the sound
    And soon the word's spreadin' through our part of town
    "Yo, 40 Park y'all, Jam-On's gettin down"
    Yeah...

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  2. #82
    From Outta Space! Cozmo D's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Louis85@Dec 21 2004, 09:16 AM
    I'm just glad that Avon got what he richly deserved. Plus he saw the warrant with Stringer's name on it! Sweeeeet! I think the guilt of letting his best friend get capped is really starting to eat at him. That plus Marlo showing up at his trial is better than him getting capped himself. Great writing on this show!
    Hell yes! That and to see that his sister wouldn't even look at him at the trial and then left! I wonder if she finally figured the whole shit out about D'Angelo.
    Alright
    Tap the lightpole and we'll be jammin all night
    And ain't nobody callin' the cops
    'Cause everybody's here freakin', if they're older they're doin the rock
    And every block from all around
    Comes runnin' to the park when they hear the sound
    And soon the word's spreadin' through our part of town
    "Yo, 40 Park y'all, Jam-On's gettin down"
    Yeah...

    Jam-On Productions:Website Forum

  3. #83
    pm dawn fam til infinity Hero1's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Be@Dec 22 2004, 01:20 AM
    That season finale was WEAK......muhh phuckin DIET WATER....as far as i'm concerned...it ended last week
    the wires like a novel right.. as coz said the endings are always like that.. the real ending was episode 11.. the final episode is always wrapping things up and setting shit up for the next season..its like a prologue
    I've got amnesia.. I can't remember..

  4. #84
    waiting for Spring Louis85's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Be@Dec 21 2004, 10:20 AM
    That season finale was WEAK......muhh phuckin DIET WATER....as far as i'm concerned...it ended last week
    Yeah, they were more concerned with tying up loose ends for the next season. I agree, the week before was much better. Stringer getting capped is right up there with Said killing Adabisi on Oz. Great drama!



    Louis
    I love the summer months!

  5. #85
    From Outta Space! Cozmo D's Avatar
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    From another site...

    'The Wire' fears
    HBO may snip it ....


    By MARISA GUTHRIE
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER


    Bell (Idris Elba, l.) parries Det. McNulty's (Dominic West) questions.

    At the climax of its third season, HBO's gritty drama "The Wire" is hanging by one.
    "We haven't been renewed," said creator David Simon, "We have not been killed either."

    A decision on the fate of Simon's critically praised series about the dangerous corners of Baltimore's drug trade isn't expected until mid-January.

    "I know [HBO] isn't particularly pleased with our numbers," Simon said. "Why would they be? But, at the same time, I'm not sure what on HBO besides maybe 'The Sopranos' could have gone up against the buzz saw that is 'Desperate Housewives' and Sunday night football."

    "The Wire," which has its season (or series) finale Sunday night at 9, boldly killed off a major character last week when Stringer Bell (Idris Elba), a dealer trying to go legit as a real-estate developer, was gunned down.

    "I checked the [message] boards this morning and every body's upset about Stringer," said Simon. "All I can tell you is the only way the writers can figure out how to make the stories matter is to not make characters matter more than the stories."

    On Sunday, there is more closure and another character is put out to pasture, though not in a predictable way.

    "If we have to end here, I'll be sad," said Simon. "There is a lot more I want to say. It took a lot to create this fictional universe of Baltimore and there's a lot more to say."

    But "The Wire" has been criticized for its labyrinthine plot lines; its liberal use of urban vernacular has also stymied some viewers. But HBO has made a habit of nurturing esoteric series.

    "This show would have been canceled after four episodes anywhere else," said Simon. "If [HBO] says, 'Nice try, but we're going to go with something else,' then they say it. Does that mean I have even the slightest regret that I didn't make the show simpler or dumbed it down or made the cast more white? Absolutely not."

    If "The Wire" makes it to fourth season, said Simon, he plans to explore the failures of the public education system in Baltimore.

    "Like a lot of cities," he said, "we have a remarkably dysfunctional school system, one that puts the lie to the idea that if you want to walk away from the street, you can just put your head down and do what's right. You start to get the impression that the children of this city are being raised by the drug corners, that this is a school system that fits with a society where the drug trade is the best deal of its generation."

    But he may not get the chance. The overwhelming success of "The Sopranos" has changed the climate at HBO.

    "Because of 'The Sopranos' breakout hit status," said Simon, "expectations have changed." The days when a dark prison drama like "Oz" could survive several seasons may be coming to a close, according to Simon.

    "There was no angst about ['Oz'] ratings," said Simon. "It was what it was. There was a commitment to storytelling, even if it was idiosyncratic storytelling. Now I'm going up against 'Desperate Housewives.'

    "What could have gone up against 'Desperate Housewives'? 'Desperate Housewives' is pretty. I'm not about pretty."

    Call HBO @ 212-512-1208
    Alright
    Tap the lightpole and we'll be jammin all night
    And ain't nobody callin' the cops
    'Cause everybody's here freakin', if they're older they're doin the rock
    And every block from all around
    Comes runnin' to the park when they hear the sound
    And soon the word's spreadin' through our part of town
    "Yo, 40 Park y'all, Jam-On's gettin down"
    Yeah...

    Jam-On Productions:Website Forum

  6. #86
    pm dawn fam til infinity Hero1's Avatar
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    god i hope they renew it.. the school system story would be very interesting...
    I've got amnesia.. I can't remember..

  7. #87
    From Outta Space! Cozmo D's Avatar
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    I don't know what I would do without my Wire.
    Alright
    Tap the lightpole and we'll be jammin all night
    And ain't nobody callin' the cops
    'Cause everybody's here freakin', if they're older they're doin the rock
    And every block from all around
    Comes runnin' to the park when they hear the sound
    And soon the word's spreadin' through our part of town
    "Yo, 40 Park y'all, Jam-On's gettin down"
    Yeah...

    Jam-On Productions:Website Forum

  8. #88
    pm dawn fam til infinity Hero1's Avatar
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    cutty interview!

    http://www.allhiphop.com/alternatives

    Chad L. Coleman: Through The Wire
    By Dove ~Sheepish Lordess Of Chaos~

    Virginia native-turned-New Yorker Chad L. Coleman has made an impressive showing on season three of The Wire as Dennis ďCuttyĒ Wise, a street smart yet under-educated man with a jaded past and an amazing hope for the future. After studying acting at both Virginia Commonwealth University and the Herbert Bergoff studio in New York, Chad took on more intensive training with Howard University professor Vera Katz. He has acted in off-Broadway plays and regional theater, performing alongside the likes of vets like Willem Dafoe and Patrick Stewart, and has performed in several commercials and television shows including Law & Order.

    Chadís role as Cutty gave the popular HBO series a different, and almost moral, direction without being too preachy. It is interesting to note that while Cutty speaks slowly and often uses less than desirable grammar, Chad speaks smoothly and swiftly with the air of a distinguished gentleman. Where Cutty deliberates internally about basic day to day activities, Chad asserts himself with confident expression. The man and his character seem to be worlds apart in demeanor and life experiences, but it is evidently clear that Chad understands Cutty on a level that transcends mere acting.

    AllHipHop.com Alternatives got caught up in an intense conversation with Chad L. Coleman about the development of the storylines and character interaction on The Wire, and what ĎCuttyí represents beyond the television show.

    AllHipHop.com Alternatives: We have interviewed JD Williams and Hassan Johnson both about The Wire, and talked quite in-depth about them going into Baltimore. You guys have talked to the people of Baltimore one on one a lot about their street life and picking up the dialect and things like that. Hassan mentioned that he was a little disappointed sometimes that there really wasnít a consistency with the actors getting that dialect down. It almost seems like your character, Cutty, has his own dialect. Heís maybe not as educated as some of the other guys. How did you work in developing that role from a standpoint of the diction that you use?

    Chad: Basically for me, it as the producers filled me in on information about the character, and Iím dealing with a producer like George Pelecanos who created my role. He had already written a book about a guy who was incarcerated and came out and was trying to get his life together. The blueprint was there, it just came - it wasnít something I was trying to go for. It was creative inspiration, along with information from the producers - but if you break it down, if you think that this was a kid that came up, he didnít get a high school diploma, he spent most of his life on the street. Even on the show when they would ask about getting a GED, thatís not something he wanted to pursue. His passion for change was definitely there but it wasnít on kind of an intellectual route, if you will.

    The way the dialogue is written, heís not a man of that many words - you know thereís a lot going on with him but he doesnít like to speak a lot. I would say itís just a hybrid of a lot of different sounds that make up Cutty, because you canít necessarily say who he may have encountered while being incarcerated, itís not necessarily that he just hung out with everybody from one particular region.

    AHHA: Exactly, and I think in a certain way that it was good that they didnít make him some kind of dude thatÖ I mean he definitely came out with a vision of wanting to do something different with his life and make something out of himself, but at the same time they didnít have him come out being some super enlightened ĎIíve been reading all the law booksí guy.

    Chad: At the same time too, there are certainly those who do and who have, thatís for sure. The thing thatís interesting about the character, what makes it compelling is heís unsure, he doesnít know what to do. It makes him all the more human, heís growing - youíve watched him grow into a certain level of assuredness. Thatís whatís really cool about it, because you get to follow someone that thereís no idealism involved in it at all.

    AHHA: I loved it that they showed that kind of back and forth, ĎDo I wanna get back in it? Do I not wanna get back in it? The communityís all f*cked up but what can I do? I canít even get a job.í Simple everyday things that everyone takes for granted that this guy has to struggle with, and I think they did a really good job of showing somebody whoís got a good heart and who wants to change, but everything points back to ĎWhat else do I do?í

    Chad: Thatís absolutely right, what are your options and having it all play out in sort of a real time circumstance as opposed to some kind of quick fix? Thatís what I encounter in the streets of New York everyday. Brothers that just want to come up and just say ĎThanks man, thatís me Iím dealing with that right now, stay strong, keep doing ití. Thatís the reality, just like the guy on the shows that say, ĎYeah itís hot, itís hot out here everyday, you know this is as good as it gets right now, and if you donít understand and accept that first, youíre not gonna be able to move any furtherí. Thatís powerful because youíre used to fast money youíre used to certain lifestyle, and that can only be achieved criminally, and if you really need to changeÖ

    Thatís the thing about Cutty, I just think thatís the amazingly beautiful thing about him, in the midst of all of that he still makes his decision. But at the same time you can tie it in as, well, like he was into boxing, heís a Golden Globe boxer, itís not like someone like Mike Tyson. Mike has chosen from having been around Don King and around probably some Muslims to try to achieve a certain kind of communication skill. Cuttyís not that way about it, even though I think his level of communication has certainly expanded and is improving as he tries to deal with these young kids, you see that happening, you see him starting to be able to really kind of talk to these kids. You really donít know where his growth curve is, you never know where Cutty may end up.

    AHHA: Exactly, I think thatís the excitement of it though for the fans, everyone really likes that character. Iíd say next to Omar heís probably the favorite. OmarÖ that character is probably like one of the most complex and unique characters that Iíve ever seen on TV. Cuttyís right up there though - you really never do know where heís gonna show up next week.

    Chad: Right, you donít know what heís gonna do and thatís beautiful because that really hits home with a lot of people. The things that we take for granted, a certain level of intellect, a certain amount of moxy and how to deal in life, and all these things that we take for granted are really things that you really have to work on, people have to be helping you implement that at a very early age for it to come to some degree of second naturedness. Itís not even totally that, we all struggle too, we all struggle but the struggle maybe doesnít appear as dire. But we all do, we all struggle with elements of character and right and wrong and purpose, and what weíre going to do with our lives and all that stuff.

    AHHA: There are obviously a lot of parallels in what happens on the show to real life situations. For instance Avon funded the boxing ring for Cutty, obviously thereís a situation there where Cutty kind of basically said when he left the operation, ĎYouíre my guy and everything, but I donít wanna be involved in this anymoreí. Avon saw what he was trying to do and was like, ĎHere you do something good with this moneyí. Yet the money is drug money. Is there any moral dilemma on the part of you as an actor to say ĎAre we saying that this is okay by showing this kind of thing on TV?í

    Chad: Thatís a very interesting question. I think that is the thing - to show a certain level of irony. Itís just not black and white, so to present that to the audience - itís for them to have to wrestle with that. I donít absolutely have the answer to it. The producers of the show are obviously saying something right here. Cuttyís just aware as anybody else that there are very little options and help out there for the state that these people are living in, so you canít make the same moral and character choices that someone else does. Thatís something Iíve always found extremely compelling, because the people who are assessing the situation grew up a whole different way. Theyíre living by a whole different set of rules.

    Now Cutty, even in trying to change, understands that heís still playing in a different playing field. So to say, ĎIíll remove myself from doing drugs and Iíll try to do something positive with my lifeí doesnít mean that I just flip the whole thing over into a whole different level of morality. How he rationalizes it is, ĎI need help and I donít have any other sourcesí, or he says to himself, ĎHey I can go out here and get two dollars, three dollars here, but at what point is that gonna have an impact on these kids? Iím trying to deal with these kids here and now.í To have that paradox to me is okay.

    AHHA: Itís almost like between Avon and Cutty, thereís this really deep level of respect that you donít see between a lot of the other characters.

    Chad: Exactly, and it speaks toÖI think on a lot of levels Avon feels trapped. Every time when said ĎI canít be in the game anymoreí - If you notice what said, his response to that was: ĎHe a man todayí. I was trying to explain to people thatís very telling about something internally in him. He feels a certain level of probable doom, a lack of hope. ĎThis is the way it is, Iíve got to live this outí - so to see someone else making an attempt to do something other than that, he wanted to be supportive to that.

    AHHA: Well it takes big balls to step out of that game, because youíre giving up a lot of things. Not only are you giving up your street cred and all that and your money and things like that, but youíre also giving up your protection in a lot of ways.

    Chad: Right, and he could have flipped it and killed anyway.

    AHHA: Thereís a certain code of honor.

    Chad: In him as a human being, so when it resonates in that someoneís trying to deal with their own code, he deals with it. Whereas Stringer, thatís why these things really happened to Stringer, he was totally out for self. He lacked any kind of allegiance to anybody but himself.

    AHHA: Stringer had a lot of things in his past and I think that he didnít really have the same respect for the same codes of ethics between the different crews. Like when they were saying no more killings on Sundays and things like that.

    Chad: But where does that come from? Something happened to him a long time ago where heís detached from people period on a certain level, heís just detached. So whatever level of abandonment or something that he experienced early in his life, he said itís all about self and self-preservation, and, ĎItís about playing anybody around me to get what I wantí. Itís all about opportunity to me with him, so thatís why I thought it would have been interesting. I wish he was there when said ĎI canít do it anymoreí. I thought that would have been really really interesting to see his reaction to that. I think he would have been smart enough to plan, it would have been interesting to see him play into Barksdaleís mentality, to play as if he saw it the same way. Like let Slim Charles say what he said and then play into it. Heís constantly trying to read Barksdale.

    AHHA: Yeah he is, I think he was also always trying to put stuff in Barksdaleís head too and I think he would have been the dude that wouldíve said, ĎAw man, you just gonna let him walk out like that? No loyalty, whatís up?í I think Stringer wouldíve questioned that.

    Chad: Yeah, but thatís what I was saying, the subversive nature of him though is to read those around him, and at that point say what Barksdale wants to hear and then you see it come down the road where he really stands, like a phony. You canít really live like that. Not to stray offÖ

    AHHA: Itís all good. Going into the next season, Avonís going in, but heís the only boss now because thereís no more Stringer. The streets gotta be Ö

    Chad: Well, I mean not really though if you think about whoís already holding it down.

    AHHA: Whoís at the helm though without those two there? Prop Joe, it gives him more of a chance to step in.

    Chad: Yeah but they already have a rival, thereís already thatís a young gun thatís there.

    AHHA: Exactly and that guyís crazy.

    Chad: I donít know that heís crazy, I think the young man is aggressive, heís smart, heís aggressive, heís hungry and he wants to wear the crown.

    AHHA: Mmhm, well he seems to have a really coldÖitís almost like he doesnít even see people as people at all. Heís got this super criminal mentality.

    Chad: Right, heís no different , heís like Stringer without a suit on, thatís something they always talk about, that itís a young manís game. If you go to Baltimore right now the dudes that are slinging and running stuff are really young. Thatís whatís going on.

    AHHA: That makes sense. Letís get off The Wire for a little bit. Any other acting jobs that you have on deck?

    Chad: Well, I was able to do a little work in Carlitoís Way: The Beginning. Itís going back before Pacinoís character went to prison, the prequel.

    AHHA: Iím gonna speak on all of the comments that women make about you. How does it feel to be pretty much considered a sex symbol at this point? The women really love you.

    Chad: Well I mean thatís great - that feels great. I donít see myself as that, when I hear people speak that way. My wife tells me that all the time, so to have that level of acknowledgement thatís cool. I think thatís what women identify in me. Itís like a Ďreal maní, itís not a Ďpretty boyí man, itís just a handsome rock man.

    AHHA: Itís almost like they made Cutty and a couple of other characters almost asexual, like you guys are never gonna have a girlfriend on that show.

    Chad: Well I donít know, Iím not gonna say that because you know, did try to get ex-girl back.

    AHHA: We want the characters on HBO The Wire to have sex sometimes because it looks like Stringer was pretty much the only one getting any.

    Chad: Well, no, Lieutenant Daniels.

    AHHA: Oh yeah, but theyíre all doing each other in the police precinct.

    Chad: Which is what happens, you work in a certain radius, you end up mating and having sex with the people you work with. Thatís the thing about them, they hit the bullís eye on all of it, because none of it is random. Itís all been highly researched, theyíve done books on it. One is 20 years a reporter in Baltimore, one is 20 plus years as a detective. Thatís Ed Burns and David Simon - you put those two together, and then the guys that they have as producers and writers all write crime novels and things of that nature. Theyíre all like in there.

    AHHA: Yeah, Itís definitely one of the most amazing shows as far as writing. Between that and The Sopranos, I think just the character development for me are the best shows on TV.

    Chad: Yeah which is why it baffles me a little bit that we donít know that thereís gonna be a fourth season.

    AHHA: Are you serious?

    Chad: There hasnít been any official announcement at all.

    AHHA: Thereís gonna have to be.

    Chad: I donít know how they compute these things because thereís a need.

    AHHA: I think itís gonna come down to exactly what happened with The Sopranos, when they were trying to say, ĎThis is going to be the last seasoní the fans just went berserk. Like ĎHow can you just leave it like this?í So they had to go back and make new episodes, and I think thatís whatíll happen with The Wire, itís got a strong following.

    Chad: Thatís what I said on , I said, ĎLook, you guys gotta let the people know that this is what you want, make yourself heard that you want this and then see where they go from thereí. I donít know the way they compute the numbers, right now Desperate Housewives is cleaning up on Sunday nights. But people also know they have the option to watch The Wire later in the week.

    AHHA: Yep, youíre In Demand.

    Chad: So, itís hard - I donít know why they would look at the numbers just from the standpoint of that night.

    AHHA: Exactly, what they should be doing is going to the cable company and checking those In Demand numbers.

    Chad: Absolutely, weíll see. I definitely hope thereís another season.

    AHHA: Me too, I really do.
    I've got amnesia.. I can't remember..

  9. #89
    pm dawn fam til infinity Hero1's Avatar
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    and guys complete this hbo survey..it'll encourag em to renew

    http://www.hbosurveys.com/surveys/wire04.htm
    I've got amnesia.. I can't remember..

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